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Film

Little Miss Sunshine (Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, 2006)

When Frank (Steve Carell) moves in with his sister’s family, it’s clear that something terrible has happened. It’s the beginning of the movie
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Food

Ivan Carvalho’s Grocery List

We asked Ivan Carvalho, Milan correspondent for Monocle magazine and wine passionate, to share his grocery list with us so we could get to know him better.
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Art

Cooking Soul: Rene Mesman

The Amsterdam based photographer Rene Mesman creates clean still life images starting from food to end up with the most unusual combinations.
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People

Sharing table with Licia Florio

We shared a table with Licia Florio and with her positive vibes towards beauty and lifestyle. Milanese adoption and yoga lover
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Books

Food on Shelves: Les Dîners de Gala by Salvador Dalì

Apparently, artist Salvador Dalì was very passionate about food and had wanted to be a Chef ever since he was a child.
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Drink

A drink at 7pm: Luca Arnaboldi’s Moscow Mule

Luca Arnaboldi is a Senior Partner at Carnelutti Studio Legale Associato in Milan and has been with the firm since the beginning of his career.
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Art

Cooking Soul: Nicholas Barclay

Nicholas Barclay is an art director and graphic designer working in Sydney. He has made a name for himself in the world of art and illustration with his clever and catchy designs.
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People

Sharing table with Maurizio Galimberti

We shared a table with Maurizio Galimberti who told us about his obsession for photography and fragmentation.
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Places

Best Pizza: Martino Gamper’s Margherita Integrale at EF Bakery, London.

Martino Gamper is an Italian designer, now based in London.
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Food

Paola Clerico’s Grocery List

We asked Paola Clerico, curator and art consultant for projects such as Case Chiuse, Lira Hotel and Art at Work, to share her grocery list with us so we could get to know her better.
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Film

Food on Screen: taste of Western Part. 1

In 1903, the American frontier was officially closed and the western genre arrived in cinemas with the film The Great Train Robbery (Edwin S. Porter).
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Drink

A Drink at 7pm: Nathalie Jean’s Klinec

Anybody who hangs out on Via Solferino in Milan will be familiar with Nathalie Jean’s boutique.
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Drink

A Drink at 7pm: Dimitri Russo’s PIMM’S

Dimitri Russo is a private investigator. He has been part of the Pisacco family for a long time now, so we asked him to share his story with us and tell us why, of all the drinks, he goes for PIMM’S.
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Books

Food on Shelves: The Gourmand

The Gourmand is a biannual food and culture magazine founded in 2011 by David Lane and Marina Tweed.
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Art

Coming Soon: StraightUp@ExtraDry

ExtraDry is an exhibition of video art born from the desire to draw contemporary art out from its usual expositive spaces and onto the walls at Dry, Via Solferino 33, and the new Dry, Viale Vittorio Veneto 28, in Milan.
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Art

Cooking Soul: Carl Kleiner

Swedish photographer Carl Kleiner has a real passion for rational, still-life imagery.
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Art

Cooking Soul: Nico Therin

Nico Therin is a Los Angeles based visual artist who specializes in advertising photography.
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Food on Screen: taste of Western Part. 1

By Valentina Barzaghi

In 1903, the American frontier was officially closed and the western genre arrived in cinemas with the film The Great Train Robbery (Edwin S. Porter).

It was the first time that audiences had seen a cowboy on the big screen, not to mention his horse, the food he ate and all the legends that surrounded him. 

Coffee, beans, meat, sourdough and stew: the five essential elements of a typical Western meal. 

Coffee is the only item that a cowboy will ever share. The rest is jealously guarded because there is never enough food to satisfy a cowboy’s hunger. 

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In films like Seven Men from Now (Budd Boetticher, 1957) or Johnny Guitar (Nicholas Ray, 1954), coffee is represented as a hero’s best friend when it comes to relaxing. It is no coincidence that in his latest film The Hateful Eight, Tarantino chose coffee to take advantage of a dangerous moment of distraction. A cup of the hot black drink is for when Cowboys are enjoying a break from their adventurous lives. That is why we always see coffee consumed in specific places such as the camp or at home. 

Saloons are places for fast consolation, a whisky at the bar before guns start firing. The life of a cowboy is mainly nomadic: they live alone or in caravans. A lot can be deduced about their lives and nutrition from their location. The North is usually home to solitary men and their shotguns: they are hunters and they usually eat their prey. The East is the land of caravans, the home of farmers and their territory conflicts. Vegetables, fruit and cereals grow here which is why they fight over water and boundaries. The West is an abandoned land that only has gold to offer. Cowboys in the West survive on coffee, whisky and lunch meat. 

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Movies such as The Last Wagon (Delmer Daves, 1956) or Bend of the River (Anthony Mann, 1952), showed life in the caravans. The characters were usually pioneers: former soldiers in search of a new life. They fought against the Indians for years but also learnt a lot from them. In fact, beans, lunch meat and even coffee - a local substitute for tea - are typical Indian provisions (in The Last Hunt - R. Brooks, 1956 - Indians show the pioneers how to smoke bison meat). When pioneers arrive in new territories, they lay the groundwork for agriculture and a new way of eating. 

Beans were always associated with the imagery of the cowboy genre, especially Spaghetti Westerns: in Trinity Is Still My Name (Enzo Barboni, 1970), Terence Hill enters a restaurant alone and eats beans directly from the pot. This scene became so famous that an entire generation of Western fans ate beans every day. Their goal? To become real cowboys of course! Terence Hill and his famous friend Bud Spencer brought a national version of the iconic American classic to the Italian and European public. The Spaghetti Western is now a b-genre that is famous across the globe and can namecheck directors including Sergio Leone, Sergio Corbucci and Lucio Fulci, as well as artists such as Ennio Morricone. 

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